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Wednesday, 23 September 2015

Fully loaded we got snacks and supplies..

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 When I was in my teens, I absolutely couldn't wait to learn to drive. Living in a rural place will do that to you. It was 10 miles to the nearest town, but the bus went through all of the surrounding villages, meaning that the journey time was an hour. Such a pain. 

Needless to say, as soon as I turned 17, lessons started and I passed my driving test a few months later. Since then I guess I've not really looked back. I really like driving and am happy to be the designated driver for nights out - not a chore as I don't drink anyway. 

In fact, I think it's rather great. In the past, when I've had fleeting thoughts about moving to a big city, I've pondered the option of living without a car, but I'm not really sure how one does it. It's like when friends who live in cities tell me that they've not bothered with learning to drive. It was such a fundamental "freedom" thing for me, that the concept doesn't really compute. How do they go places, whenever they feel like it? How do they get their shopping home after a particularly heavy burst of  spontaneous retail therapy?

After ten years or so of driving (mostly commuting, both whilst I was studying at university and since then to and from work, but also weekend excursions to see friends who are located all around the UK), I guess it's natural that sometimes you can get a bit lazy with it, and pick up all kinds of bad habits. Reading through this article researched by Simpson Millar however, filled me with confidence that I'm not doing *that* badly, although I do get a little road-ragey sometimes, so language inside the car can get a little, shall we say, colourful...?

Do you drive? If so, what would you say was your worst driving habit?


13 comments:

  1. I know what you mean, learning to drive for me was so important and I wanted to get it done before I went to uni as I knew I couldn't afford it then. I genuinely don't need a car living in London, but we've just done a driving holiday in Ireland and me and the boyf are now dying to have one. It's not to get me to and from anywhere, but more to escape the city. It would be lovely to just get in the car and drive to the countryside whenever we wanted.
    Cx
    charliedistracted.com

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    1. Yes, it's so nice to just be able to escape whenever and not have to rely on timetables.

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  2. I didn't know about the first "wackiest driving laws" in the article - good to know! Haha. I get a bit road ragey too. People who drive 40mph everywhere drive me mental. They're speeding through built up areas yet painfully slow on main roads. Argghh!!

    Driving was definitely a freedom thing for me as well and I'm so glad I passed as soon as I could. I like being able to go where I want, when I want without having to rely on another person. As a non drinker as well I often get bored on nights out (drunk people can get annoying after a while) so I like knowing that I can escape and get home safely without waiting for a lift or taxi/bus.

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    1. Yep, 40mph-ers are frustrating!

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  3. I SHOULD drive, as I don't drink, but I'm nervous at high speeds and I've only got vision in one eye properly so not learnt.x

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    1. I don't think there's any *should* about it. No point if you're not comfortable with it!

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  4. I've not learned to drive yet, mostly because I've always found better things to spend my money on, and also because I'm terrified of dying in a car crash. I'm lucky that public transport is pretty good where I live, even living in a small-ish town. It takes me about an hour to get to my nearest city, but I can get to most of the places I want to go, so I've not really felt the need to learn yet. It does take longer to get places, but it's never been a huge hassle. As for shopping- I used to come home with bruised, red raw wrists and aching shoulders from carrying a million shopping bags, when I used to splurge my ass off. Serious shopping commitment! Haha! I always wished I could drive then! I know I'll learn sooner or later, but I've got by just fine til now. xx

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    1. I think it really depends on what your public transport situation and circs are.

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  5. My worst habit is drifting off into my own thoughts. I often get to a destination and I can't remember the journey, having driven completely on auto pilot!
    It took me ages to get behind the wheel, I didn't think I'd get the hang of driving (and my parallel parking is still dreadful) but once I did, there was no stopping me. I find it even more enjoyable now I have a sat nav and don't have to worry about getting lost!

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    1. I think I sometimes do that, too. Worrying really, but when it's a journey you do often, I guess it becomes second nature like so many other things.

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  6. I think I may be guilty of using less-than-friendly language in the car too - fine unless I've got the kids in the back seat!

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  7. I'm really ashamed to admit how old I was when I finally got my driving licence. In my defence, I did try to get it when I was 18 but I failed and I didn't have the money to take the extra classes....years and years later, I got my driving test but I don't drive...with one exception. I drive on roads that are not crowded, for example in rural parts, country and nature. When I say that I don't drive, I mean I don't drive in the city...to be honest, I don't need the car in the city. The two of us have only one car so I wouldn't be able to drive it anyway most of the time (we can't very well divide it)...when I worked in school, I walked to work every day and I enjoyed it.

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